knitting · pattern · photo posts · Uncategorized · wool · yarn

Mina Shawl.

Let’s All Overuse Semicolons Together!

Something new is up over on Ravelry:

Mina Shawl! Obvious reference, slightly questionable taste (I only knew Dracula from pop culture and memes before this year; I did not expect Mina to be so affecting as a character)!

The colors on this one were inspired directly from some speckled and solid Malabrigo Arroyo I was working with for a sweater pattern. There wasn’t really enough left from the skeins I had to get the effect I wanted, but I really liked how the speckled combined with the more traditional hand-dyed yarn. Lazy gradient, kind of.

Anyway this is the best shawl I’ve come up with in a long time. It might be the full-on best, but I’ve also been looking back through my photos, and now I think some of my other ideas were stronger than they felt at the time. (I took a screenshot for a joke about a video game—it’s very important that I find this and actually post the joke somewhere—but this was around the time of Conduit Cowl and Iteration, and those are a lot nicer than I remember.)

I have a lot to do this month: either I update the Sample Shop page here for the upcoming winter holidays, or I don’t; I have a lot of upcoming design projects I’m excited about; I want to knit little animals for the kids. (It’s a whole weird thing. I’m still excited when I can afford to buy a cool present; I want to buy Lego; and yet kids have started to specifically request knitted things. It’s perplexing but not all bad, and also not all good, since it is very hard to knit a 4-foot-long caterpillar and have it turn out well. I should’ve just learned to crochet and done a space millipede from Projectarian. Mine’s okay, but it’s not a space millipede, so it feels like a missed opportunity.)

Uncategorized

New Hats and Changes!

Oh no! I forgot to publish my exciting New Hats post, and now it feels really dated.

There have been two new hat designs! This one is the most interesting as a hat:

It’s called Provisions Hat and goes different directions!

The other is very simple, but has more intermediate finishing techniques, plus it’s knit in the round, plus optional finishing makes it convertible, so that it can be worn as a hat or a collar. (Plus) I have a couple more ideas to work out that are similar, but I need to brush up on cable terms and possibly learn to chart a design effectively for the one.

It’s a sack hat, but I’m not sure how obvious that is from most of the photos, since part of what I like best about it is the neat-looking edge when it’s in hat form. It’s so simple! So easy to knit! But you get this sleek double fabric at the end!

Uncategorized

SOCIAL MEDIA BLITZ!

Oho, the one social media I neglected this month is the official website-y one.

We have a new shawl pattern out! It’s here!

There are a few Son of Dog Days and Summer Kitchen projects left to wrap up, but we’re heading directly into September in a couple of hours, so I’m not sure whether I’ll have those out late, but still this year (it’s technically still summer for the next ~21 days where I am!), or if I’ll save them for next summer. The farmer’s market bag is probably the most exciting one to me, but I haven’t been to the farmer’s market yet this year.

So! That’s the August update! I will catch you next month (probably?).

Uncategorized

dinosaur bones

The title is misleading clickbait. There are no dinosaur bones in this post. I am not really even sure why past-me thought that was a useful heading. Was it going to be about dinosaur bones? I cannot remember.

I haven’t actually posted about any of the recent design projects! I haven’t posted for July!

The main Summer Kitchen (well, loosely: Summer Kitchen has become home decor/organization/housewares in general, and wool boxes are maybe not kitchen-related specifically) project is Little Boxes. (The one above is shown pre-felting. It gets its shape from the yarn it’s holding, but after felting, this particular sample didn’t get as small as the others I’ve done in the same yarn—one even from the same skein. I probably need to up the agitation.) There are some others in the works, but it’s probably going to feel too early to talk about them up until the last minute.

Isurus is the latest shawl. I haven’t been this excited about a shawl in a while, but this was pretty rewarding to design & knit, and finally got me using the fancy Hedgehog Fibres yarn I’ve been holding on to for two years. Two years!

That’s probably going to be it for July, since it’s the 30th now and all. Cheers!

knitting · pattern · photo posts · Uncategorized

By the end of the month, if all goes to plan, I’ll have published 10 indie patterns this year, so far—

but 6 of the 9 so far are hats;

two are shawls,

and two of the planned ten are cowls.

(One’s a connected triangle cowl. It could use some new photography. But that aside, it looks like I still classed it as a cowl, rather than as a bandanna or a headband. One is a balaclava, but you can wear a balaclava as a hat, so I counted it in the hat category.)

This seems unbalanced, with a considerable lean towards hats, and that bothers me a little—but it looks like I am/may still be in a hat phase for a little while. I’ve been playing with some structural ideas, which seem fairly compelling to me, and I guess on the up side, small projects like hats and socks are decent for spring and summer knitting—but I still feel a sort of low-level anxious desire to Get Ahead with those in a way that would free up some time to experiment with some spring and summer tops and light sweaters.

In other news, Igneous/Igneoramous is available now (link here or above), SALT cowl is coming soon (sneak preview in first photo—it’s really simple but still extremely satisfying), and everything that comes after that is too far out or too early in planning for me to talk about it without jinxing it.

Uncategorized

Stay-at-Home Auxiliary Scarf, Day 14 (and counting): Two Approaches to Finishing.

There are two* ways to finish the Stay-at-Home Auxiliary Scarf: with a knitted border, which was the original idea but will definitely take some stitch management, or with i-cord, which might be easier, given the length of the edges of the 14-square scarf.

For the knitted border, you’ll need the longest circular needle available (I used a 48”/120cm needle, and it was tough going); for the i-cord, two DPNs are recommended.

*Or two ways I am going into, I guess.

I-Cord.

I-cord worked over 5 sts.

The I-cord border can be worked over 3 or 5 sts, depending on your preference. Two double pointed needles (in size used for overall gauge) will make it easier, but this can also be done with a circular, if you can’t find your DPNs and are only doing a few rounds to show how the technique should work. This is a weird, unlikely scenario, though, in no way related to the photos. (The sentence preceding this one is not sincere. I could not find my DPNs. I did the thing I am talking about.)

When finishing the 14th square, do not bind off.
This will leave you with 3 live sts.

Switch to DPNs.

(For the 5 st version only: flip to the WS, and, using the cable cast-on method, add 2 sts.)

Work attached I-cord border:
k3(5)
*slide sts to working end of the needle.
k2(4), slip last st as if to knit, pick up 1 st from next selvedge.
k last st tog with picked-up st, as if working a ssk.*

Repeat ** until i-cord edging has been applied all the way around. On the corners, you can pick up 2 sts in the same selvedge or cast-on bump, but other than that, pick up 1 st per selvedge.

Finish i-cord by weaving the live sts together with the first sts, as if working Kitchener st.

Weave in ends, block, and you’re done!

Knit Border.
(This version was the original, but it can be genuinely tricky to keep >902 sts on a long circular needle. Putting the project down can result in mild heartbreak and dozens of stitches popping off; there is a palpable risk of breaking a wooden needle. Mine held up, but it was a close thing for a while.)

Finish the 14th square according to the line instructions. You’ll be left with 1 live stitch on the needle.

Pick Up Sts.
With the RS facing up, working right to left, pick up 30 sts per each mitered square, for a total of about 420 sts. (See Note, below.)
Turn work 90 degrees. Pick up ~31 sts along this side. Place a removable marker on the first and 31st sts.
Turn work 90 degrees. Pick up ~420 sts along the side.
Turn work 90 degrees. Pick up ~30 sts along this side. Place a removable marker on the first st, and on the live stitch from the bindoff.

There will be about 902 sts.

Note: the exact number of stitches, especially on the long edges, isn’t too important; the instructions that follow will still be functional if the stitch counts are slightly off.

Work continues from here in the round.

Begin Work.
Round 1. [k1, p to next marked st] around.
Round 2. [k1, m1l, k to next marked st, m1r] around (8 sts inc) 910 sts total.

Repeat Rounds 1 & 2 two more times. (926 sts total)
End with a repeat of Round 2.
Bind off using the basic method. Break yarn, weave in ends, and block!

Mine isn’t blocked yet. It turned out way better than I’d hoped, though, and I hate to admit it, but 14 squares looks about ideal for a scarf.
Uncategorized

The Kemmerer Cowl.

So at some point, I intend to switch over from my little amateur free blog to this Actual Website(tm), but it seems like I keep updating the to-be-abandoned blog instead of this one, because I don’t want to lose the (very small) momentum of that one, and no one is really reading this yet. Which is freeing, but also freeing from the incentive to try to build up the blog part of the site so people will have something to read. There’s something deep about that, man. Freedom and freedom from reward.

Anyway, I managed to get a second pattern published in January! This means I’m slightly behind schedule in terms of my indie design goals for this year, but it also means I’m not unrecoverably lagging. And I’m really pleased with this cowl design, although also honesty surprised at how popular it’s been in the forty hours it’s been available.

DSC_0073.jpeg

The Kemmerer Cowl is the latest design, available as an instant .PDF download via Ravelry! It combines simple garter stitch with an interesting seaming technique. It’s a good way to show off a fancy hand-dyed yarn (and it knits up in one skein, so you can even use those extravagant one-skein-dyelots), and makes a very wearable finished piece. DSC_0086.jpeg
It can be purchased via Ravelry as an instant .PDF download, and it’s 15% off through February 14th.